While gun owners are looking further to better their firearms, reading various articles and reviews on how to improve their optics, gun-control advocates are sending disputes to lawmakers on the second amendment regarding control.

image source: flickr, simonov

Guns, firearms, and other weapons are improving as part of technological innovations that we are now facing in this era. And as we grow to develop weapons, more and more people are disputing the laws that regulate licensing and use of these weapons. Why have guns become easily purchased by an average individual? To answer this, let us trace down the history as to how and why guns have become cheap that practically anyone could make a purchase.

This discussion draws on lack of knowledge on the background of guns. It is correct that in the year 1791 the most typical weapons were long guns or handguns that needed to be reloaded every shot. However, it is simply not true that continuing firearms, which could fire several times without having to reload, were not visioned in that year.

How Firearms Become Less Expensive

Among the men who take credit for why continuing firearms grew to become a lot less costly is James Madison. He wrote the Second Amendment. Throughout Madison’s term in presidency from 1809 to 1817, James Monroe, then secretary of war, effectively endorsed laws to promote the introduction of firearms engineering. Professionals were brought in to create the firearms that have interchangeable parts.

To work dependably, continuing firearms should have inner elements that have to fit together accurately. Before the manufacturing revolution had emerged, firearms were created one-by-one by workmen. Creating a continuing firearm needed far more time and knowledge than creating a single-shot gun. Making repeating firearms had been widely recognized, but producing them within a labor price an average joe can pay for had been unattainable.

Because of the technologies developed at Harpers Ferry and Springfield, inventors discovered approaches to produce firearms parts at an increased rate, along with more uniformity for every part. Rather than every single part created by hand, pieces were being produced with equipment tools.

The Springfield Armory functioned with growing machinists for additional consumer items; the trade of knowledge within this technology network was brought immediately to Connecticut River Valley from New England. It has now become the facility of American consumer guns and firearms producer.